How to Quit Your Job Gracefully

Dos and Don’ts For Quitting Your Job

It’s time to leave your job. Whether you worked there for only a few months or for a significant portion of your life, it is important that you leave with grace to keep within good standing with the company.

Just because you are moving on to a new journey in your life does not mean that you should throw away the growth and experiences you attained while working at this company. Be kind, be courteous, and don’t burn the bridge.

1. If You Can, Give at Least Two-Weeks Notice

Once you know for sure that you are going to be leaving your company, you should let your employer know. It is customary to give your company two-weeks notice so that they have time to prepare for your transition.

With that being said, you don’t want to give notice that you are leaving too early. If you are planning on moving six months into the future, you can keep it to yourself until the time gets closer. Unfortunately, some bosses may terminate your position early on because they know that you won’t be there for much longer. They also may hold off on promotion and raises for the same reason.

Sometimes it isn’t possible to give two-weeks notice, but that’s okay. For example, a few years ago I had a coworker come into work saying that Friday was going to be his last day (he told us on a Wednesday). His father had suddenly fallen ill, and he lived in South America. My coworker was moving back home to help take care of his family, and time was of the essence. Because he was upfront and honest about why he was leaving so suddenly, he still kept within good graces with the company.

2. Be Kind and Humble/ Don’t Burn the Bridge

This is not the time to tell your boss that you always thought that they were a jerk, or to finally tell one of your coworkers to “Go to Hell.” Also, if you are leaving your job for a much better job, don’t rub that into your coworkers’ faces.

Just because you are leaving does NOT mean that these people will no longer be a part of your professional life. You should make sure that everyone with whom you worked closely becomes a connection on LinkedIn. If at all possible, ask your supervisors if they’d be willing to write you a letter of recommendation. I still have a letter of recommendation from a boss I had nearly five jobs ago that I still use on job applications.

When it comes to your coworkers, these are people that might help you find work later down the line, so don’t burn this bridge either. Tell them that you enjoyed your time working with them, that you wish them all the best, and to keep in contact.

3. Be Honest About Why You Are Leaving

When you go through a break-up, you immediately are struck with the question “Why?” To some degree, the same thing happens to your boss. They want to know why you are leaving, and if there is anything that they can do to get you to stay.

Give the honest reasons for why you are leaving. If you are leaving due to a problem you encountered with the work environment, let your boss know. They can potentially fix this problem so that no other employee needs to deal with it.

If the reason why you are leaving feels overly personal, you can keep it vague. For example, a relative of mine once left a job because they were moving after a bitter divorce. She didn’t want her personal business to become office gossip after she left. She told her employer that she was moving, and kept it at that.

4. If Your Boss Wants You to Stay, Hear Them Out

If you are leaving your job for a new job, it is probably because they are either paying you more money and/or giving you work you prefer. Once you tell your boss that you are leaving, they might make you an offer to get you to stay. This offer may include more pay, better hours, new benefits, or even promotion.

Even if there is nothing your boss could possibly offer to get you to stay, hear them out. It’s important to stay respectful. Simply tell your boss that your new opportunity is too good to pass up and that you owe it to yourself to give it a go. Also let them know that you are grateful for your time with the company.

5. If Possible, Suggest Someone to Replace You

Now that your previous job is going to have a vacancy, you might be able to suggest someone to fill that role.

If you have a friend or previous coworker that is looking for work, and would be a good fit for your company, they might be able to replace you. Talk to this person beforehand to see if they would be interested in working your old job. Give them an idea on what the work environment is like, what the job entails, and what they can expect for compensation. If they seem up to the task, suggest to your boss that they replace you.

Offering a replacement is a great way to help out your old company and a friend in one fell swoop. However, don’t suggest a friend to replace you just because they need a job. If your friend gets hired and does a horrible job, you can burn the bridge with your old job, and possibly tarnish the friendship if they get fired.

Now that your previous job is going to have a vacancy, you might be able to suggest someone to fill that role.

If you have a friend or previous coworker that is looking for work, and would be a good fit for your company, they might be able to replace you. Talk to this person beforehand to see if they would be interested in working your old job. Give them an idea on what the work environment is like, what the job entails, and what they can expect for compensation. If they seem up to the task, suggest to your boss that they replace you.

Offering a replacement is a great way to help out your old company and a friend in one fell swoop. However, don’t suggest a friend to replace you just because they need a job. If your friend gets hired and does a horrible job, you can burn the bridge with your old job, and possibly tarnish the friendship if they get fired.

6. On Your Last Day, Celebrate With Your Co-workers

This may sound a bit silly because you don’t want to celebrate the fact that you’re gone. However, you should celebrate your time with the company and this new stage in your life.

It is customary for some jobs to throw a “going away” party for coworkers that are leaving. However, don’t expect to get one. If you do get one, be grateful and thank each person in attendance.

On your last day, you could bring in doughnuts or pizza for your coworkers. If you have a lot of coworkers and a limited pizza budget, you can instead suggest that you all go out for drinks or dinner after work.

This celebration is a great way to leave a final good impression with your coworkers and supervisors. Remember, you may need these connections in the future. You may even want to work for this company again later on in life. Whatever the case may be, you don’t want to leave a sour taste in their mouth if you have the option to leave the taste of a doughnut instead.

7. Don’t Feel Guilty About Leaving

When you work at the same job for a long time, they can start to feel like family. Many of us make the best friends of our lives and even meet our spouses through our jobs.

However, at the end of the day, it is still just a job.

Most companies realize that they are a stepping-stone in your career and not the end of the journey. Although it is okay to get emotional about your departure, don’t let your feelings for your coworkers or job keep you from what is best for you and your career.

Through the magic of social media, you can still remain friends with your coworkers virtually. You can also exchange phone number so you can still see each other after work and on weekends.

8. Get Ready For Your Next Step

Now is not the time for tears, but for excitement! You are about to embark on this next step in your life, and you should put your best foot forward! If you are looking for a new job, that starts with a sharp resume! Consult with a professional resume writer to ensure your resume will be noticed by the companies where you want to work.

How to Deal With Office Gossips

It’s uncomfortable when someone spreads rumors. What should you do? How do you handle it? Read on for valuable tips for dealing with office gossips.

The Best Ways to Deal With Office Gossip

As your coworkers gather around the water cooler, you’re bound to hear someone say, “Did you hear about Mark,” “Can you believe what happened to Lauren,” or “What do you think is going on with “Jamie?”

That’s right, you have just stumbled upon some office gossip. Although some juicy gossip can buy some short-term entertainment, it can cause some irreparable harm to your workplace.

Office gossip cannot only lower morale, but it can cause people to lose their jobs. If you hear some coworkers gossiping, follow these steps to keep the situation from getting worse.

1. Quell the Situation With Your Words

When you hear one of your coworkers starting to gossip, there are things you can say to quash it in its tracks.

Some things you can say include:

  • That’s none of our business
  • We shouldn’t talk behind their back
  • That’s their business
  • I don’t want to talk about that

After you saying that, try to change the subject to something work related.

2. Tell Your Coworker About the Gossip Being Spread About Them

Even though you don’t want to hear about any office gossip, there is a chance that it will be spread regardless. If this happens, you should tell your coworkers that someone is spreading a rumor about them.

Depending on the rumor, this could be awkward, but tell them that you are coming to them as a concerned coworker and that you would want them to do the same were the situation reversed.

3. Got to Your Supervisor or Confront the Gossipers

Once you’ve told your coworker about the rumor, encourage them to speak with a supervisor about the situation. Also, discourage them from confronting the gossipers directly if they seem hotheaded. If your coworker can settle the situation civilly with the gossipers, that’s optimal, but if it will turn into a screaming match, it’s best to avoid that entirely.

If the rumor is toxic, personal, or career-threatening, you should go directly to your supervisor. Starting a rumor about someone being in an elicit or illegal activity is not something to take lightly.

4. If the Rumor is True, Act Accordingly

If you tell your coworker about the rumor spread about them, there is a chance that you’ll learn that the rumor is true.

Most likely, if the rumor is true, you should still encourage your coworker to either confront the gossipers or go to your supervisor. However, in some scenarios you might want to consider other options.

If you learn that your coworker’s well-being is in danger, you might want to consider that they speak with the Human Resources Department, or even the police. For example, if your coworker is involved in a sexual relationship with someone at the company, encourage them to disclose the situation to HR. If you learn that their life is in danger for one reason or another, go to the police. If you learn that they have severe depression and that they are growing unstable, encourage them to consult HR and look into seeing a therapist.

You might also learn that your coworker is involved with something illegal, and are unwilling to stop. In this situation, you should bring this information to your supervisor.

5. What if Someone Starts a Rumor or Gossips About You?

If you have an office bully, there is an entire other article you need to consult. However, if you learn that someone has started a rumor about you, we recommend that you do the following:

First, you should record the instance. Log when you heard the rumor, who you heard it from and what the rumor was.

Second, you should tell the person you heard it from that the rumor is false and to stop spreading it.