Why is it Important to Have a Positive Social Media Presence?

Maintaining a professional presence on social media is becoming more and more important. Follow these tips and tricks on how to keep your online presence clean while still having an outlet to vent.

“Big Brother” is Always Watching You on Social Media

It goes without saying that having a presence on social media has become more of a necessity than a luxury at this point.

Sure, Facebook is still the place where you go to see your friends obnoxiously post pictures of their kids; Instagram is still the place where you post pictures of your food and look at memes; and Twitter is still the place where you learn what celebrities and influencers are up to. However, your own presence on all of these platforms reflect who you are to not just your friends and family, but also potential employers.

According to an article from CareerBuilder, about 70% of employers snoop through the social media profiles of their job candidates. With that being said, are you comfortable with potential employers seeing everything on your social media accounts?

If the answer to that is “no,” fear not! There are several things that you can do to help clean up your social media presence, and how to keep some things private.

Google yourself

A good way to start off this exercise is by Googling your name and seeing what comes up. If you have a relatively common name, maybe through your hometown or state after your name to help narrow down your results.

Once you find results related to you, take a close look at them. Ask yourself if these are the results you would want to see if you were hiring yourself. Articles about your achievements, examples of your work, and links to your social media profiles are all great things.

I Google myself regularly to make sure I maintain a positive image online. While looking one time, I tracked down an old blogging profile I made back when I was in middle school. It was full of typos, cringe-worthy things only a dumb pre-teen would say, and absolutely nothing of benefit to myself albeit a few laughs. I was able to have it taken down in a matter of minutes, but if that would have been the only thing a potential employer had to gain information about me, I would have been in trouble.

If you find anything negative, you can typically get it taken down relatively quickly. You might need to remember some old log-in information, or send a few emails, but it should be simple. Once you’ve done that, you can ensure that only positive things pop up when you are Googled. Trust us, not Googling yourself can be one of your biggest mistakes in your job search!

Why Not Just Go Completely Off the Grid?

Your first thought might be, “Why not just shut down all of my social media accounts so they can’t see anything?”

Sure, if you delete your social media presence entirely then potential employers won’t have anything of yours to see. However, that is not necessarily a good thing.

If you do not have any social media presence, it means you are not networking online, which can turn off a lot of employers. Many jobs require that you send them a link to your LinkedIn profile when you apply, and not having one can get your resume tossed in the bin before you even get a chance to interview. At the minimum, you should at least have a LinkedIn profile for employers to see.

If you are looking for a job in media, you should have accounts across the board: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn. Not only do you want to show that you can network on these platforms, but also that you know how to use these platforms as that may be part of your job!

What Should I Post and Avoid Posting

When it comes to what you can post, ask yourself if what you are posting will be jarring or alienating to others before you post it. Major updates in your life, pictures from vacations and events, and check-ins at your usual hangouts are all absolutely fine. Problems typically come into play when you start posting opinions on social media that shake the proverbial hive.

None of this means that you aren’t allowed to keep posting and sharing your thoughts and feelings on social media; it just means that you should be more sensitive of other thoughts and feelings on social media before posting.

For example, you can show support to causes and candidates that mean a great deal to you, but you should avoid personally posting about most things that are political and religious. Political posts and religious posts can be problematic for employers even if they agree with your stances. Once hired, you will be a representative of their company, and they don’t want your posts to alienate clientele with opposing viewpoints.

Keeping Accounts Private

If posting your in-depth thoughts on subjects like politics or religion on social media is important to you, there is a way to still make it happen. You can make another account with no affiliation with yourself. Don’t attach your name or any of your contact information to the account, and use it to offer your opinions to your audience.

Many people have an Instagram or Twitter account that is only used for posting memes, getting political, or for promoting their side hustles. None of these things need to flood your personal profile, so keeping these separately is a great way to keep your professional image untarnished while still allowing you to have an outlet.

Posting on LinkedIn is Different From Posting Elsewhere

LinkedIn is for business and for updates in your professional life. Your vacation to Cancun, your nephew’s Bar Mitzvah and your thoughts on the newest Toy Story movie do not need to be on LinkedIn.

The main things you will be doing on your LinkedIn are making connections, keeping your page up to date, and exploring work opportunities. However, there are opportunities to post on LinkedIn. Articles related to business, professional growth or your industry can and should be shared. post the article with your own thoughts on what is being discussed. By doing so, you’re inviting others to join the discussion. Once others start to comment, their connections will begin to see your post, and your network will then continue to grow!

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How to Follow Up on an Interview

You just aced a job interview!

You leave the office feeling so good about the interview, and you cannot wait to hear back. You know that you should follow up, but how should you do it and what should you say?

You know you need to say something, but you don’t want to come off as too cocksure or disinterested. It’s like having a great date. You want to see the person again, but you don’t know when to reach out or what to say!

In this article, we will discuss some methods of how to follow up with an interview, so that you can start your new job!

The purpose of the follow up

The reason you are following up with the company is to thank them, and to get more information. What is this information you may ask? You are looking to see if there are any updates in the interview/hiring process, and you are looking to see if they want to schedule a follow up interview with you. If in your previous interview you were told that you may speak with another person at the company before a final decision is made, see if you can get that interviewed in the calendar!

When to send a follow up

In general, you should follow up within 24 hours of your interview. At this point, you are still fresh in their minds. However, at least wait until the following day to send them a follow up. If you send one from your car in the parking lot of the building where you were just interviewed, that’s way too soon.

Should I do an email or phone call

If you have been communicating with the company mainly through email, then you should send an email. If you have mainly been communicating via the phone, give them a call. However, make sure that you follow up with the person that interviewed; not necessarily your point point of contact.

For example, if you were mainly communicating with a talent acquisition company or a hiring coordinator, but you interviewed with a manager of a company, send your follow up to the manager. They are the one who is going to make the ultimate decision.

Prepare what you want to say in your follow up

It’s not a bad idea to have a notebook on hand with a few talking points nearby if you’re following up over the phone. If you have any questions about the job, additional comments about your experience, requests for another interview, or anything else you might need.

When you send an email to the recruiter, make certain to go over every word. You can tell the interviewer how much you enjoyed the interview, where additional information can be found, and if there is anything else you can tell them or send them. Quite often, job recruiters will ask for examples of your work or references after an interview.

During your follow-up interview

At this point in the process, you are probably starting to get very excited. When you get to the second interview, most people will tell you that this means you 100% got the job. This is not necessarily true, so you need to be sure you nail this interview.

You are going to behave very similarly to how you did during your first interview.

Often times, you will be interviewing with somebody other than who you interviewed with the first time. Make sure that you know your resume backwards and forwards as they will more than likely ask you specific questions about something on your resume.

Dress up to the same degree as you did in your first interview if not a little nicer. It is important for them to see that you can pull yourself together more than once.

At the end of the interview, ask for a timeline. Ask them when they are looking to make a final decision, and when that person will start. Ask them if you can have one of their business cards so that you can send them a thank you the following day.

Concluding the follow up

Remember, if they asked for a follow-up interview with you, it means that they are interested in you. You haven’t necessarily landed the job yet, but you are a bit closer.

Sending a thank you or a follow-up message after an interview is both good manners and also a best practice when it comes to searching for a job. Follow these steps, and you will impress employers and yourself!

Need help crafting your resume for your next job?

If you’re currently looking for a job, it is in your best interest to make sure that your resume stands out above the others. Employers look through hundreds of resumes, so you want to make sure yours has the “wow” factor. Learn about our job search and professional resume writing services by emailing your resume to resumes@razoredgeresumes.com or give us a call at 1-800-730-3244.


Emotional IQ and the Workplace

“Half the world is composed of people who have something to say and canʼt and the other half who have nothing to say and keep on saying it.” Robert Frost

“The most important thing in communication is hearing what isnʼt said.”Peter Drucker

“Wise men speak because they have something to say; Fools because they have to say something.”Plato

Building up your emotional IQ

I love quotes. Even the simplest thought can sometimes cause the most profound reflection. Since quotes are a form of communication, there is also a special double return about quotes on communication for me. It’s like getting both butter pecan and chocolate chip ice cream in one sugar cone.

Naturally, communication hits a very important sweet spot in the professional environment as well. While things like verbal, listening and writing skills are paramount, there are also four supportive communication skills that could also be essential to a successful job search. According to Martin Yate in his essential tome, “Knock ʻem Dead: The Ultimate Job Search Guide,” these skills include grooming and dress, social graces, body language and emotional IQ.

Granted, it is a bit easier to assess the more representational of these skills. If your clothes are pressed and your hair is neatly combed, you are bound to make a better impression than if you walk into an interview in your pajamas while sporting a serious case of bedhead. A confident stride, firm handshake and relaxed eye contact with your interviewer are also going to be a lot more effective than a halting shuffle and a downward cast in your demeanor. The more at ease and confident you are with yourself, the better you will represent yourself.

Emotional IQ skills

Emotional IQ seems a bit harder to categorize. Unlike general intelligence, there is really no way to test or scale emotional intelligence. Thus many psychologists and scholars tend to argue that Emotional IQ is not an actual thing, but merely a descriptor of interpersonal skills that go by other names. Those skills would include:

  • A. Emotional Awareness or the ability to be conscious of and give a name to how you are feeling in any particular moment.
  • B. Emotional Control or the ability to reign in any particular emotion and thus be able to apply it to oneʼs responsibilities and tasks.
  • C. Emotional Management or the ability to regulate your emotions and to help others to do the same.

Despite the fact that some studies have found no bridge between emotional intelligence and job performance, some employers have incorporated emotional intelligence tests into their employment processes in the belief that they help determine leadership qualities. Thus, it is probably helpful to at least be aware of those attributes.

Personal growth

As with anything, I believe that such awareness cannot only help with a job search, but with personal growth as well. As a creative person, I find I can occasionally act with tense and frustrated emotions when confronted with unknowns and stressful situations. To be conscious of that and to begin to be able to temper and control those feelings would be a great benefit in all situations for me.

I am sure that there are things that, upon reading the above list of traits, you feel that you could effectively adjust yourself to achieve more success. For as famed motivational speaker Brian Tracy says, “Personal development is a major time-saver. The better you become, the less time it takes you to achieve your goals.”

Need help crafting your resume for your next job?

If you’re currently looking for a job, it is in your best interest to make sure that your resume stands out above the others. Employers look through hundreds of resumes, so you want to make sure yours has the “wow” factor. Learn about our job search and professional resume writing services by emailing your resume to resumes@razoredgeresumes.com or give us a call at 1-800-730-3244.